Thursday, September 22, 2016

 

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Based on the Consumer Price Index for the 12-month period ending August 31, 2016, Thompson Reuters Checkpoint has released their projected inflation-adjusted Estate, Gift, GST tax, and other exclusion amounts for 2017, as follows: (more…)

Friday, October 30, 2015

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Even though you think you have done everything right, the statute of limitations may not have started to toll if your Form 709, Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, contains errors. Once a properly completed (how much can we stress the words PROPERLY COMPLETED?) Form 709 is filed, the Service must assess the amount of any gift tax within three years of the filing date. Under the Regs, a transfer is adequately disclosed when the return provides the following:

(i) A description of the transferred property and any consideration received by the transferor; [and]

(iv) A detailed description of the method used to determine the fair market value of property transferred, . . . including any financial data . . . utilized in determining the value of the interest. (more…)

Friday, March 20, 2015

459482489The Treasury Green Book provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning is found on page 200 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

LIMIT DURATION OF GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER (GST) TAX EXEMPTION

Current Law

GST tax is imposed on gifts and bequests to transferees who are two or more generations younger than the transferor. The GST tax was enacted to prevent the avoidance of estate and gift taxes through the use of a trust that gives successive life interests to multiple generations of beneficiaries. In such a trust, no estate tax would be incurred as beneficiaries died, because their respective life interests would die with them and thus would cause no inclusion of the trust assets in the deceased beneficiary’s gross estate. The GST tax is a flat tax on the value of a transfer at the highest estate tax bracket applicable in that year. Each person has a lifetime GST tax exemption ($5.43 million in 2015) that can be allocated to transfers made, whether directly or in trust, by that person to a grandchild or other “skip person.” The allocation of GST exemption to a transfer or to a trust excludes from the GST tax not only the amount of the transfer or trust assets equal to the amount of GST exemption allocated, but also all appreciation and income on that amount during the existence of the trust.

Reasons for Change

At the time of the enactment of the GST provisions, the law of most (all but about three) States included the common law Rule Against Perpetuities (RAP) or some statutory version of it. The RAP generally requires that every trust terminate no later than 21 years after the death of a person who was alive (a life in being) at the time of the creation of the trust. (more…)

Thursday, March 5, 2015

459482489The Treasury Green Book provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning is found on page 203 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

MODIFY GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER (GST) TAX TREATMENT OF HEALTH AND EDUCATION EXCLUSION TRUSTS (HEETS)

Current Law

Payments made by a donor directly to the provider of medical care for another person or directly to a school for another person’s tuition are exempt from gift tax under section 2503(e). For purposes of the GST tax, section 2611(b)(1) excludes “any transfer which, if made during the donor’s life, would not be treated as a taxable gift by reason of section 2503(e).” Thus, direct payments made during life by an older generation donor for the payment of these qualifying expenses for a younger generation beneficiary are exempt from both gift and GST taxes. (more…)

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

A recent Private Letter Ruling (PLR 201320009) issued by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) blessed a conversion of a grandfathered Trust to a unitrust determination of income, as not causing any loss of the Trust’s generation-skipping transfer (GST) tax grandfathered protection, and not resulting in a gift or in the recognition of any gain. Here, the trust in question had been held for the benefit of the Settlor’s son, but the son had since died and the trust was now held for the benefit of three grandchildren. No additions had been made after September 25, 1985. However, the trust determined the income to be distributed to the grandchildren under the traditional method, with interest and dividends constituting trust income.

Long after the trust became irrevocable as a result of the death of the Settlor, the state in which the trust was being administered enacted legislation authorizing the conversion to a unitrust determination of income. The trustee determined that such a conversion was in the best interest of the grandchildren and sought to convert the trust to a unitrust. The state statute required that the grandchildren, who were all legally competent to act on their own behalf, to consent to the unitrust conversion. The trustee sought and the IRS ruled that the conversion did not cause a loss of the trust’s grandfathered status as exempt from GST tax, did not cause any beneficiary to be deemed to have made a taxable gift, and did not cause the trust or any beneficiary to realize capital gain so long as the trustee strictly adhered to the requirements of the new state statute in completing the conversion. (more…)