Bryan Cave  Life Death and Taxes

Trust Bryan Cave

Gifting

Main Content

Charitable Income Tax Deductions: The Rockefeller Edition

rockefeller-center-midtown-west--new-york-city-new-york-usa_mainBillionaire David Rockefeller passed away this week at the age of 101.  According to Forbes magazine, during his lifetime, the well-known philanthropist gave away nearly $2 billion.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

COPYING IS BEST IN THE ING WORLD

PLR 201642019

Not only is strict adherence to the structure set out in prior favorable rulings best, it is essential when it comes to obtaining a favorable ING ruling. The provisions in the trust document need to carve a very fine line through the grantor trust/incomplete gift rules to obtain a favorable ING ruling. The goal is to have the Service rule that a trust is not a grantor trust for income tax purposes yet not a completed gift for gift tax purposes and included in the grantor’s estate to get a basis adjustment at death.

The earliest ruling, ILM 201208026, fell short of a favorable ruling with the Service finding that the retained testamentary power of appointment was insufficient to avoid a completed gift. By 2014, practitioners had carefully studied this early ruling and devised a set of trust provisions that

To Do: Year-End Gifting. Check (or not)

(This is an updated post from December 2015)

With the end of the year approaching, we thought now would be a good time to re-post and update this blog from the end of 2015.

For 2017, the annual exclusion gift amount will remain the same at $14,000 but the lifetime gift and estate tax exemption will increase to $5,490,000 (up from 2016’s $5,450,000).

With fourteen days left in the year, many people are still planning how to make 2016 gifts, whether by making “annual exclusion” gifts of $14,000 per beneficiary, or by taking advantage of the 2016 gift tax exemption amount of $5,450,000.  Whatever the reason for the last-minute gifting, as the end of the year approaches, people may be tempted to make a “quick and easy” gift to their beneficiaries by simply writing a check. As the year draws to a close, however, if your gift is dependent on utilizing 2016

Projected Inflation-Adjusted Estate, Gift and GST Tax Exclusion Amounts for 2017 Now Available

 

8635181-background-concept-illustration-consumer-price-index-stock-illustration

Based on the Consumer Price Index for the 12-month period ending August 31, 2016, Thompson Reuters Checkpoint has released their projected inflation-adjusted Estate, Gift, GST tax, and other exclusion amounts for 2017, as follows:

To Do: Year-End Gifting. Check (or not)

With the end of the year approaching, we thought now would be a good time to re-post and update this blog from the end of 2014.

For 2016, the annual exclusion gift amount will remain the same at $14,000 but the lifetime gift tax exemption will increase to $5,450,000 (up from 2015’s $5,430,000).

With fourteen days left in the year, many people are still planning how to make 2015 gifts, whether by making “annual exclusion” gifts of $14,000 per beneficiary, or by taking advantage of the 2015 gift tax exemption amount of $5,430,000.  Whatever the reason for the last-minute gifting, as the end of the year approaches, people may be tempted to make a “quick and easy” gift to their beneficiaries by simply writing a check. As the year draws to a close, however, if your gift is dependent on utilizing 2015 tax law, beware of the potential trap of making a gift

HELPING YOUR ADULT CHILDREN

HELPING YOUR ADULT CHILDREN

November 11, 2015

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

ThinkstockPhotos-475946938

 

Open up any newspaper or magazine across the county and likely you will read an article about the difficulties facing young adult looking for their first jobs.  More and more young adults are turning to their parents for financial assistance. How can parents help their children? And what are the gift tax implications of such assistance?

Each individual has the ability to gift $14,000 a year to each person without using up any of his or her lifetime exclusion. A married couple can then gift $28,000 to an adult child without any gift tax impact at all. However, you must keep in mind that this $14,000 amount is inclusive of all gifts. You cannot give $14,000 directly to your child and then give them additional withdrawal rights under a trust.

Let’s Go Over this Again: Remember to Dot Your I’s and Cross Your T’s

ThinkstockPhotos-475606957

Even though you think you have done everything right, the statute of limitations may not have started to toll if your Form 709, Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, contains errors. Once a properly completed (how much can we stress the words PROPERLY COMPLETED?) Form 709 is filed, the Service must assess the amount of any gift tax within three years of the filing date. Under the Regs, a transfer is adequately disclosed when the return provides the following:

(i) A description of the transferred property and any consideration received by the transferor; [and] … (iv) A detailed description of the method used to determine the fair market value of property transferred, . . . including any financial data . . . utilized in determining the value of the interest.

Treasury Green Book Proposal: Health and Education Exclusion Trusts

459482489The Treasury Green Book provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning is found on page 203 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

MODIFY GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER (GST) TAX TREATMENT OF HEALTH AND EDUCATION EXCLUSION TRUSTS (HEETS)

Current Law

Payments made by a donor directly to the provider of medical care for another person or directly to a school for another person’s tuition are exempt from gift tax under section 2503(e). For purposes of the GST tax, section 2611(b)(1) excludes “any transfer which, if made during the donor’s life, would not be treated as a taxable gift by reason

Treasury Green Book Proposal: Annual Gifts

459482489The Treasury Green Book provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning is found on page 204 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

SIMPLIFY GIFT TAX EXCLUSION FOR ANNUAL GIFTS

Current Law

The first $14,000 of gifts made to each donee in 2015 is excluded from the donor’s taxable gifts (and therefore does not use up any of the donor’s applicable exclusion amount for gift and estate tax purposes). This annual gift tax exclusion is indexed for inflation and there is no limit on the number of donees to whom such excluded gifts may be made by a

Treasury Green Book Proposal: GRATs and Other Grantor Trusts

459482489

The Treasury Green Book provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning is found on page 197 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

MODIFY TRANSFER TAX RULES FOR GRANTOR RETAINED ANNUITY TRUSTS (GRATS) AND OTHER GRANTOR TRUSTS

Current Law

Section 2702 provides that, if an interest in a trust is transferred to a family member, any interest retained by the grantor is valued at zero for purposes of determining the transfer tax value of the gift to the family member(s). This rule does not apply if the retained interest is a “qualified interest.”

The attorneys of Bryan Cave LLP make this site available to you only for the educational purposes of imparting general information and a general understanding of the law. This site does not offer specific legal advice. Your use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Bryan Cave LLP or any of its attorneys. Do not use this site as a substitute for specific legal advice from a licensed attorney. Much of the information on this site is based upon preliminary discussions in the absence of definitive advice or policy statements and therefore may change as soon as more definitive advice is available. Please review our full disclaimer.