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Charitable Income Tax Deductions: The Rockefeller Edition

rockefeller-center-midtown-west--new-york-city-new-york-usa_mainBillionaire David Rockefeller passed away this week at the age of 101.  According to Forbes magazine, during his lifetime, the well-known philanthropist gave away nearly $2 billion.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts

 

People.com is reporting that Amber Heard, who received a $7 million settlement in her divorce from Johnny Depp this week, is donating the entire $7 million settlement to charities with “a particular focus to stop violence against women” as well as the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts

According to area newspaper the St. Louis Post Dispatch, one of St. Louis’ wealthiest families, that of Enterprise Holdings founder Jack Taylor, is making some very large charitable donations this week–a total of $92.5 million to 13 cultural institutions and charities, most local to St. Louis.

In light of this, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) governs income tax deductions for charitable contributions. In the case of an individual making a cash gift to a Section 501(c)(3) organization classified as a “public charity” (such as churches, schools, hospitals, and governmental units), the gift is deductible for federal income tax purposes so long as the aggregate gifts do not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (“AGI”) for the taxable year.

Starting and Governing a Nonprofit 501(c)3 Organization in Missouri

September 8, 2014

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Originally Posted on BryanCaveCharityLaw.com.

Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in 202 J.C. Penney Conference Center at UMSL.

Starting a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and governing a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization are flip sides of the same coin. Instructor Dan Sise knows that the steps you take in forming a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation affect how your organization must operate in the future. And the steps you take in the governance and operation of your 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation affect your ability to maintain your 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status with the IRS on an ongoing basis.

Come to this class to learn how to start a Missouri nonprofit corporation that will seek to obtain 501(c)(3) tax exempt status from the IRS. In addition, this class will also cover good governance policies, strategies, and requirements that will allow your organization to maintain its 501(c)(3) tax exempt status on an ongoing basis

A 200% Tax on Self-Dealing? And People Think the Estate Tax is High!

With research and drafting assistance provided by our extern from Washington University School of Law, Rachael Lynch.

Now that we’ve scared you with the potentially high taxes for self-dealing in private foundations, what is self dealing?

Self dealing includes any of the following transactions:

Charitable Gifts to Supporting Organizations

With research and drafting assistance provided by our extern from Washington University School of Law, Rachael Lynch.

As we discussed in our prior post, Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts, an income tax deduction up to fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income is allowed for gifts to public charities of non-capital gain property and up to thirty percent (30%) for gifts of capital gain property. These same contribution limits apply to gifts to supporting organizations.

What is a supporting organization? Supporting organizations are described in Section 509(a)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code as charities that carry out their exempt purposes by supporting other public charities. A supporting organization generally warrants public charity status because it has a relationship with its supported organization sufficient to ensure that the supported organization is effectively supervising or paying particular attention to the operations of the supporting

Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts

zuckerbergThe Chronicle of Philanthropy recently released its list of the Top 10 biggest charitable gifts of 2013 (which is really the Top 15, since 5 gifts tied at 10th place), and do they make me wish I qualified as a charity!

Topping the list at Number 1 were Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, and his wife, Priscilla Chan, who gifted $992.2 million of Facebook shares to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. Number 2 on the list were Nike Chairman Phil Knight and his wife, Penelope Knight, who made a $500 million pledge to the Oregon Health and Science University Foundation.

The list continues:

3. Michael Bloomberg: $350 million pledge to Johns Hopkins University

Could theTax Relief Act Hurt Charitable Giving?

January 3, 2013

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From BryanCaveCharityLaw.com

Effective December 31, 2012, Congress passed The American Tax Relief Act of 2012 (the “Act”) to avoid the fiscal cliff and President Obama is expected to sign the bill into law.  The full text may be obtained by clicking here.  In a Chronicle of Philanthropy article (which may be obtained by clicking here), Doug Donovan writes that the Act may hurt charitable giving in light of the fact the Act “reinstates a provision eliminated in 2010 that reduces itemized deductions by 3 percent of the amount that household income exceeds $300,000.”  Mr. Donovan goes on to explain that “[w]rite-offs grow more limited the more taxable income a person has and could reduce the value of deductions by up to 80 percent for the highest-income taxpayers, according to the Tax Policy Center.”

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