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THE STATUTE “SAYS WHAT IT MEANS AND MEANS WHAT IT SAYS”

U.S. v. McNICOL 829 F.3d 77 (1st Cir. 2016) (cert. denied 1/9/2017)

Trusts and Estates practitioners often focus solely on the Tax Code found in Title 26 of the United States Code and ignore other parts of the United States Code (U.S.C.). However, it is a mistake to do so as Marci McNicol learned first-hand. In this case, the Federal Priority Statute found in 31 U.S.C. § 3713 came into play to impose liability on Marci for the decedent’s unpaid Federal income tax liability.

Here, at the time of his death, the decedent owed over $300,000 in Federal income taxes. As a result of this and other liabilities, the decedent’s estate, which consisted almost entirely of interests in two closely held companies, was insolvent. Marci, the decedent’s widow, transferred decedent’s interest in one of the companies to herself even before the court had appointed

COPYING IS BEST IN THE ING WORLD

PLR 201642019

Not only is strict adherence to the structure set out in prior favorable rulings best, it is essential when it comes to obtaining a favorable ING ruling. The provisions in the trust document need to carve a very fine line through the grantor trust/incomplete gift rules to obtain a favorable ING ruling. The goal is to have the Service rule that a trust is not a grantor trust for income tax purposes yet not a completed gift for gift tax purposes and included in the grantor’s estate to get a basis adjustment at death.

The earliest ruling, ILM 201208026, fell short of a favorable ruling with the Service finding that the retained testamentary power of appointment was insufficient to avoid a completed gift. By 2014, practitioners had carefully studied this early ruling and devised a set of trust provisions that

NO AUTOMATIC CLOSING LETTER, BUT WAIT – THERE ARE ALTERNATIVES

IRS Notice 2017-12

The Service issued FAQs in June of 2015 to let practitioners know that they were no longer routinely issuing closing letters. The Service instructed practitioners that they would now have to request such a closing letter, but could not do so until 4 months after filing the estate tax return. Their goal was to reduce the amount of work the Service needed to complete as a cost cutting measure. However, taxpayers need closure and the requests for closing letters almost became routine. Because so many practitioners were routinely requesting closing letters, the Service let it be known informally, with a posting on its website, that a transcript could be requested, and would be an acceptable substitute for an estate tax closing letter. But requesting such a transcript has not been a simple matter, with many groans of frustration along the way. The Service has now provided guidance

IRS Updates Form 990-EZ and New Options to Help Exempt Organizations Avoid Errors

February 1, 2017

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Bryan Cave’s Tax Exempt and Charitable Planning Team posted the following:

WASHINGTON — The IRS announced today the release of an updated Form 990-EZ, Short Form Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax, that will help tax-exempt organizations avoid common mistakes when filing their annual return.

The updated Form 990-EZ includes 29 “help” icons describing key information needed to complete many of the fields within the form. The icons also provide links to additional helpful information available on IRS.gov. These “pop-up” boxes share information to help small and mid-size exempt organizations avoid common mistakes when filling out the form and filing their return.

“We’ve been reviewing the areas of the form where exempt organizations encounter the most trouble,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “One out of three paper filers has an error on their form. After reviewing these trouble spots, we developed this new option to help groups

Doug Stanley of Bryan Cave to Give Estate Planning Presentation to Artists at the Regional Arts Commission

January 3, 2017

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On February 13, 2016, Doug Stanley, partner in the Private Client Services group at Bryan Cave, and Justin Flach of The Commerce Trust Company (an alumnus of the Bryan Cave Private Client Services group), will present “Creating A Living Legacy”, addressing estate planning basics to a group of artists.  The presentation is hosted by the Volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts and will be held at the Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar, St. Louis, Missouri.

Bryan Cave’s Private Client Group Recognized as “National Tier 1” in Trusts and Estates

November 14, 2016

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Bryan Cave’s Private Client Group was recently recognized by US News & World Report’s 2017 “Best Law Firms” as a “National Tier 1” practice in the Trusts and Estates category.

best-law-firms

2017 Qualified Plan Limits Released

November 2, 2016

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2017 Qualified Plan Limits Released

November 2, 2016

Authored by: Charles Lin

Originally posted by our employee benefits and compensation team, here.

2017 Qualified Plan Limits Released

Posted: 31 Oct 2016 12:15 PM PDT

The IRS recently released updated limits for retirement plans.  Our summary of those limits (along with the limits from the last few years) is below.

Type of Limitation 2017 2016 2015 2014 Elective Deferrals (401(k), 403(b), 457(b)(2) and 457(c)(1)) $18,000 $18,000 $18,000 $17,500 Section 414(v) Catch-Up Deferrals to 401(k), 403(b), 457(b), or SARSEP Plans (457(b)(3) and 402(g) provide separate catch-up rules to be considered as appropriate) $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 $5,500 SIMPLE 401(k) or regular SIMPLE plans, Catch-Up Deferrals $3,000 $3,000 $3,000 $2,500 415 limit for Defined Benefit Plans $215,000 $210,000 $210,000 $210,000 415 limit for Defined Contribution Plans $54,000 $53,000 $53,000 $52,000 Annual Compensation Limit $270,000 $265,000 $265,000 $260,000 Annual Compensation Limit for Grandfathered Participants in Governmental Plans Which Followed 401(a)(17) Limits (With Indexing) on July 1,

THE CHOICE IS NOW YOURS

THE CHOICE IS NOW YOURS

October 6, 2016

Authored by: Kathy Sherby and Charles Lin

Rev. Proc. 2016-49

The recent issuance of Rev. Proc. 2016-49, which modifies and supersedes Rev. Proc. 2001-38, now puts the taxpayer in the driver’s seat. Recall that in Rev. Proc. 2001-38, the Service was providing relief for the surviving spouse when an unnecessary QTIP election was made, by treating such a QTIP election as though it had not been made. Practitioners began to question whether Rev. Proc. 2001-38 would render a QTIP election a nullity when made in order to qualify for a state marital deduction where such an election was not needed to reduce the Federal estate tax liability to zero. Then when portability came into the picture, the enhanced concern about basis adjustment at death drove practitioners to want to make a QTIP election even though not needed to reduce the estate tax liability, to permit the surviving spouse to make larger gifts that would not

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