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Is the Trustee of a Revocable Trust Answerable to the Remainder Beneficiaries? Ever?

Part 3 of a 3 part series.

In a trilogy of new cases decided in the last couple of months, the courts in three states have addressed the issue of whether the trustee of a revocable trust has a duty to account to, and can be held liable to, the remainder beneficiaries of the trust, for a period during which the trust was revocable, after the death of the settlor. In reviewing the discussion of the courts in these three decisions, it is clear that, while a trust is revocable, the trustee has a duty only to the settlor, and that even after the death of the settlor when the interests of the remainder beneficiaries has vested, the trustee continues to have no duty to the remainder beneficiaries for any actions taken while the trust was revocable. In Part 1 of this series, we reviewed the case of Pennell

Is the Trustee of a Revocable Trust Answerable to the Remainder Beneficiaries? Ever?

Part 2 of a 3 part series.

In a trilogy of new cases decided in the last couple of months, the courts in three states have addressed the issue of whether the trustee of a revocable trust has a duty to account to, and can be held liable to, the remainder beneficiaries of the trust after the death of the settlor, for a period during which the trust was revocable. In reviewing the discussion of the courts in these three decisions, it is clear that, while a trust is revocable, the trustee has a duty only to the settlor, and that even after the death of the settlor when the interests of the remainder beneficiaries has vested, the trustee continues to have no duty to the remainder beneficiaries for any actions taken while the trust was revocable. In this series of blogs, we review these cases.  In Part 1

Is the Trustee of a Revocable Trust Answerable to the Remainder Beneficiaries? Ever?

Part 1 of a 3 part series.

In a trilogy of new cases decided in the last couple of months, the courts in three states have addressed the issue of whether the trustee of a revocable trust has a duty to account to, and can be held liable to, the remainder beneficiaries of the trust after the death of the settlor, for a period during which the trust was revocable. In reviewing the discussion of the courts in these three decisions, it is clear that, while a trust is revocable, the trustee has a duty only to the settlor, and that even after the death of the settlor when the interests of the remainder beneficiaries has vested, the trustee continues to have no duty to the remainder beneficiaries for any actions taken while the trust was revocable. In this series of blogs, we will review these cases.

In the first

President Obama Proposes Changes to the Transfer Taxes

On Wednesday, President Obama released his FY 2014 budget which calls for $3.8 trillion in spending over the next fiscal year and $1 trillion in tax increases over the next 10 years.

Among the proposals in the budget plan, President Obama proposes a return of the estate tax to the law in effect in 2009, which changes would go into effect beginning in 2018.  If this proposal is adopted, it would be a quick end to the “permanency” of the transfer tax law that was enacted at the end of last year.

 

Court Dismisses Widow’s Action for Damages Against Trustees for Filing Fraudulent Information Return

Right now we are all in the peak of tax return filing season. As part of the tax return process, many tax practitioners file information returns for the entities they represent. Any person, including a corporation, partnership, individual, estate, and trust, who makes a payment (such for as rent, wages, salaries, and annuities) must file an information return with the IRS to report the payment. But what happens if a false information return is filed with the IRS?

In 1996, Congress enacted 26 U.S.C. § 7434(a), which gives victims of fraudulent filing activities a damage remedy against the perpetrators. The provision applies whenever “any person willfully files a fraudulent information return with respect to payments purported to be made to any other person.” It allows the subject of the false information return to recover from the person filing the return the greater of $5,000 or actual damages flowing “as a

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